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#41 post_url

Nov 9 12 1:42 AM

uncle Jemima wrote:
chaosakita wrote:
Yeah it's weird... I was 12 when I first really gotten into j-pop and now I'm 18. That's a whole six years.

i was 13 and now i'm 20. that's a whole seven years. i actually thought it would just be a phase, like my white stripes and no doubt phases where, but nope, seven years later i'm still listening to jpop


I start listened to jpop from start of millenium, but hasn't yet joined any community until 2003, first forum was daiforum (back then I was a huge dai fan) And jpm from 2005/2006.. Of course I felt the difference btween now and that time. half or more users that I knew back then, they rarely post or even disappear and only come sometime. And it's true that besides that jpop scenes atm is not much difference than other country's music (too mainstream, idols dominated, lack of long lasting pure talents), it's also bcos of the age factor of the forum members.. Back then I was in my early 20's/late teens and now I already bcome a semi-experienced worker with so little time to explore new music market with so many new acts and acts that don't last long. So, as a result, I always return to my old faves.. And the matter is, that they're not too active either.. So even that I know current music trends and acts.. I just... Know but never too deeply involved. Things (in jpop) are just not like it used to be.. Actually not just jpop.

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#42 post_url

Nov 9 12 2:51 AM

The shift in US mainstream music for me was why Jpop declined quite a bit. I strayed away from English music when it was heavily dominated by rap and hip hop, and now that that phase is over, I enjoy most songs on the radio now. I don't really need to use Jpop as my escape anymore, and I feel the overall quality of Jpop declined as many artists started to focus more on the marketing rather than making good songs.


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#43 post_url

Nov 9 12 8:36 AM

whitedove wrote:
^ I've had disagreements with journey, but I can vouch for what being said. I honestly can't remember Jpop being more accessible back then than it is now. In fact, Jpop is more accessible NOW than 10 years ago. When Jpop comms were thriving, Youtube was still obscure. My first direct connection with Jpop wasn't even through Youtube.

I'm probably just older than the rest of you though.

LOL. smiley: roll We were such a hardcore underground back then. Some of the places I got my Jpop fix comes from HK triad, Thai forum, Russia, Hawaii, the 'infamous' Chinese site that everyone knows about, but so difficult to get in because their rules is tighter than CIA's top secret cabinet. 

I guess I'm showing my generation gap right now when I say kids nowadays have it easy. They started to demand the video to be available to them, no less than 1080 definition, in full English subtitle (with good typesetting okay) five minutes before the program even aired. And I went shesh. smiley: laugh

My bias has its own forum + I subscribed to google news feed to get the latest news. I normally hang out here (heck, I rarely even go to JPC Artist Forum) just to keep on what happen generally. And for me, that's enough, because everyone tends to copy + paste news from other forums/sources anywhere. So people are basically getting the same thing now, and there's just no time to keep up with 10 usernames everywhere. 

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#44 post_url

Nov 9 12 7:30 PM

chriszou wrote:
The shift in US mainstream music for me was why Jpop declined quite a bit. I strayed away from English music when it was heavily dominated by rap and hip hop, and now that that phase is over, I enjoy most songs on the radio now. I don't really need to use Jpop as my escape anymore, and I feel the overall quality of Jpop declined as many artists started to focus more on the marketing rather than making good songs.



for me it's not about an escape...it's just that i started listening to it then started discovering all these new artists and groups and it just became a habit, it's hard to stop.
also i read an article that mentions studies which show that your preferred type of music is kind of set in stone around the age of 14, and it was around then that i discovered jpop. so it's like i'm stuck listening to it.

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#45 post_url

Nov 9 12 11:47 PM

For me I got into J-pop because of the solo divas but around 2008/2009 they all either started taking hiatuses or releasing shit music so I slowly got detached. When I revisited J-pop back in 2011 the landscape was incredibly different with idol-groups dominating the scene all around. I still follow my favorite artists, but on the whole I think what makes K-pop more appealing is its accessibilty, I still think the Japanese music industry needs to start embracing Youtube and think of it as a means of promotion.

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#46 post_url

Nov 10 12 1:55 AM

NATE wrote:
Ditto. Getting Japanese shit was a bitch until BT became popular. I remember the only way to get the good shit in great quality was to negotiate with Japanese people to trade files with you on WinMX. This kept good Jpop media extra-exclusive because you didn't want something to get out so much that it lost its value as a tradable good. I did this shit for years and only stopped as recently as 2004. Now you can find anything from just about anyone sometimes even prior to the release week, and there's no trading, no bargaining, just BT. And before WinMX, there were secret Japanese BBSs and the hoops you had to jump through to get anything was amazing. If you were not internet savvy, you were literally dependent on the kindness of those who could get access to this stuff and let me say that the Japanese were very against foreigners sharing their shit. They would retaliate if shit leaked to Western communities, like entire sites would be deleted and migrated elsewhere or they would IP ban foreign IPs.
OMG secret Japanese BBS! I remember those!

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#47 post_url

Nov 10 12 4:04 AM

River wrote:
whitedove wrote:
^ I've had disagreements with journey, but I can vouch for what being said. I honestly can't remember Jpop being more accessible back then than it is now. In fact, Jpop is more accessible NOW than 10 years ago. When Jpop comms were thriving, Youtube was still obscure. My first direct connection with Jpop wasn't even through Youtube.

I'm probably just older than the rest of you though.

LOL. smiley: roll We were such a hardcore underground back then. Some of the places I got my Jpop fix comes from HK triad, Thai forum, Russia, Hawaii, the 'infamous' Chinese site that everyone knows about, but so difficult to get in because their rules is tighter than CIA's top secret cabinet. 


LOL if I'm thinking of the same Chinese site as you, I call them the Nazis. 

I agree that everyone has it GOOD now. When I first got into anime/seiyuu/J-pop, that was back when we all had dial-up and it took an hour or so to download ONE song. And people only ripped at 128 or 192k max. I used to get stuff off WinMX, Napster (!), or search the internet hunting new song downloads. 

I'm still around but it has been 15 years since I got into Jpop (over half my life =X) and I'm an adult now working two jobs. I still listen to Jpop all the time but between work and hanging out with my friends, I usually don't have much time to post. 

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#48 post_url

Nov 10 12 6:00 AM

uncle Jemima wrote:
chriszou wrote:
The shift in US mainstream music for me was why Jpop declined quite a bit. I strayed away from English music when it was heavily dominated by rap and hip hop, and now that that phase is over, I enjoy most songs on the radio now. I don't really need to use Jpop as my escape anymore, and I feel the overall quality of Jpop declined as many artists started to focus more on the marketing rather than making good songs.



for me it's not about an escape...it's just that i started listening to it then started discovering all these new artists and groups and it just became a habit, it's hard to stop.
also i read an article that mentions studies which show that your preferred type of music is kind of set in stone around the age of 14, and it was around then that i discovered jpop. so it's like i'm stuck listening to it.


I cant say other than agreement. I live in a country where japan language is still considered odd,not like american (and my ofc, native indonesian language) ut just like people around me felt japan songs still unusual, now I feel other songs not in japan as unsual. Well, I hear about 10 jpop a day and 70 jpop a week compared with maybe only 3-4 songs in other language a week, which probably explains why. When in karaoke place I sing no other than jpop, dun care what everyone think >_ Singing songs in my own language for example, seem..odd.. So maybe there are people like me too but theres also people that see it differently. I cant get away from jpop, at least not until my favorites are gone from the jpop scene. And at that time, if there's no new acts that can really draw a love sign in my chest, maybe i'd stop listening to jpop.. Just,maybe.

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#49 post_url

Nov 10 12 8:11 AM

Personally, I still listen to jpop/rock, although I no longer keep up with releases as religiously. That's partly because a lot of the artists I like disbanded or became inactive. And I disappeared off the forums because I got older and busier (some of the senior members may remember me being more active a few years ago). But also because there's less activity there too. So it's a vicious circle really.

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#50 post_url

Nov 11 12 11:58 AM

Nice to see fellow stallwarts from the mid-90s. Jpop has always been pretty difficult to get ahold of if you couldn't physically purchase it yourself.

They've never really cared too much about promoting outside of the country... and with how well they do within their own little circle, there really isn't a huge need to do pursue other markets.

The dinosaurs running government and industry have also passed some pretty tough laws over the years which hve finally scared me into no longer ULing...

The folks that were popular 5 years back or so aren't as active nowadays, so you won't see much chatter on them. The newer folks didn't develop big foreign followings, so the noise surrounding them is low, as well... and many of them don't release very often, either. Look at flumpool... they aren't ancient or huge, but it took them almost 30 months to drop a new release.

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#51 post_url

Nov 13 12 4:57 AM

JEWELian wrote:
2) Female solo artists have taken the backburner in the Japanese music industry now, and with artists like ayu, Kumi, namie, etc releasing less, appearing on TV less, - and even more importantly, with a lot of the artists I was crazy about in 07-10 who are now barely active at all (like ami suzuki, takasugi satomi, mika nakashima, shimatani hitomi, onitsuka chihiro, MiChi, utada, misono, ai otsuka, alan, etc etc etc), and they haven't really been replaced by a "new generation" or "wave" of artists (personally I can only think of abe mao and nishino kana). You go to Japan and all you see and hear are Johnney's, AKB and Korean groups...

This x 1000000

I stick by my main guns when it comes to Japanese music, and since they're not as active anymore for whatever reason, I just don't care. A close friend of mine who went to Japan for a year and recently returned tried to get me into Nishino Kana, and I just wasn't feeling her music. I guess you could call me stuck in my ways?

I think a good word to describe me is discerning. As I grew older, I tended to become more discerning about what I listened to in general, and if I wasn't absolutely crazy about it, I didn't have to waste time hunting down this-release or that-release. It's exhausting to devote yourself to finding everything you think you might like, so it's far easier to concentrate on what you know you'll like. (Hopefully. Assuming it's not a crappy release.)

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uncle Jemima

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#52 post_url

Nov 13 12 6:23 PM

JEWELian wrote:
2) Female solo artists have taken the backburner in the Japanese music industry now, and with artists like ayu, Kumi, namie, etc releasing less, appearing on TV less, - and even more importantly, with a lot of the artists I was crazy about in 07-10 who are now barely active at all (like ami suzuki, takasugi satomi, mika nakashima, shimatani hitomi, onitsuka chihiro, MiChi, utada, misono, ai otsuka, alan, etc etc etc), and they haven't really been replaced by a "new generation" or "wave" of artists (personally I can only think of abe mao and nishino kana). You go to Japan and all you see and hear are Johnney's, AKB and Korean groups...

the fact that you include abe mao just proves how sad the situation is smiley: roll

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#53 post_url

Nov 25 12 11:49 AM

A few factors to take into account.

1. Japan's intrinsic distaste for change. New ideas = innovation; if old men are the only one's with the last say, don't expect much.
2. Crackdown on Japanese online media. Lots of blogs and sites were forced to close with claims that they were infringing on copyrights. Also goodbye to mediafire, megaupload and other easier ways to share music. AND most integral (for me at least) jpopsuki torrent tracker/forum went down for a LONG time.
3. Those like myself who were around for the JPop Boom of the mid-late 2000s are kind of old now. 

I got into JPop around 2005 at age 14. I'm now 21 gonna be 22 next month. I got back in JPop only due to luck of the draw, that I will be going to Japan this year (in 5 days to be specific) so it's kind of a language tool.

I also like KPop too. I don't see why people have to shit on it so hard. It's the mainstream stuff  that's interesting (non-mainstream KPop is really bland) kind of like the inverse of the Japanese industry. A few more words of wisdom to kids and teens out there:
Do not place yourself outside of what is mainstream during your time. What is mainstream in your country today won't be forever, enjoy it while you have it don't put yourselves in a bubble especially of music you can't fully understand. It's something I only realized when I entered college. You want to be well rounded, strive for that,  get all up in your JPops and learn Japanese too, even. Just don't isolate yourself or you'll be come a stranger to your own country and an inevitable stranger in Japan (since if you're not Japanese, you'll never be accepted there)

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#56 post_url

Aug 18 16 2:16 PM

J-POP still popular in US and Asia

Japanese Pop still around in the market. The Japanese drama and pop been around for over 40 years, especially their "Manga" as well. They have the best Manga collection than other Asian countries. And people don't notice that the Japanese drama and pop still active until 2013. Still growing, however, they have managed to focus on other areas more like the Manga and Anime. 

Japanese drama and pop have been more popular than the Korean drama and pop. Japanese have been sinked into the Western culture for many years already and people have got used to it. So not much people realized it. LIke there is Japanese director and Japanese actress who both won an Oscar for the best film production and best supporting actress nomination. There are movies that is comiing up in 2017, like "Ghost in the Shell" or "Kubo and two strings" or "Death Notes" and etc. 

Japanese Pop is in iTunes and you can download them. There are more Japanese Pop in iTunes than Korean Pop. There are Amura Namie, Kylee, Jin Akanishi etc. And the new boy band, DA-ICE etc. All J-POP that entered the US market. China and Hong Kong still playing their drama and pop music, since 1970s until now 2016/2017. 


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[url] Version below - Amura Namie “No” song: [url]

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