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#21 post_url

Nov 1 12 9:26 PM

Ugh, I love C-pop.

Also, there are still people reviewing the newest releases for popular artists. I saw a handful for Uncontrolled. You just have to look. Unfortunately anything 'Asian' nowadays can be overshadowed by crazy K-pop tweens screaming about the latest recycled song/mv.

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#22 post_url

Nov 4 12 6:38 PM

journey wrote:
I think the people who used to frequent J-Pop sites and communities have gotten older and grown out of posting online all the time or J-Pop altogether. when I think about the people who I used see around, most of them are over 25 now, so they probably don't have the time/energy/desire to be sitting online all day.

the K-Pop fandom is full of 12 year olds with nothing better to do.
This. 

Im 24 now, and still post and stuff but no where near the amount I used to. I think most people just found their general information needed when they were younger and can now find it without much effort needing to ask others, least I did. Most of the sites kinda self imploded as well. In general just seems like everyone spread out more than disappeared/went on to something else. 

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#23 post_url

Nov 5 12 9:37 AM

It's not just the fanbase getting older, but the late 90s through mid 00's divas themselves that attracted a lot of attention to the jpop scene. A lot of them are in their 30s now, and yeah, Namie is still doing well, but a lot of the other ones are either ready to close shop, acting weird or being moms. The AKB48 clan doesn't seem to illicit the same amount of charm to western fans that the Hello Project stuff did over a decade ago, at least here. As far as the newer divas that are getting big sales, they don't cater as much to those who got into jpop 'cause of Ayumi, Koda and whatnot. Kana, Superfly, Nana Mizuki and others have their own particular styles that don't cater to as broad of a fanbase range.

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uncle Jemima

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#24 post_url

Nov 5 12 11:13 AM

see, I agree with PurpleS because there doesn't seem to be any new "it" artists that have come out in the past 10 years. we had Kana Nishino but already she's on the decline. I think the closest thing we have is Perfume.
instead we have a whole whack of artists that are doing slightly better than others (Superfly, for example) but no one that really stands out from the crowd with gastronomically high popularity or sales. that might also have something to do with the lack of community these days.

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journey

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#25 post_url

Nov 5 12 12:36 PM

I agree with PurpleS, but not Trekkie. I don't think sales have anything to do with international fandom popularity. There are/were quite a few people incredibly popular with international fans while having awful sales in Japan.

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#26 post_url

Nov 5 12 2:23 PM

Well for me im just older and Im picky about which artists I keep track of now unlike 10 years ago. I got into KPOP & JPOP at the same time. So I never left either for the other cause Ive always loved both. Im not much of a forum person as I used to be but I still love the few select JPOP artists.

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#27 post_url

Nov 5 12 2:27 PM

I still like jpop just as much as 2006. (the beginning for me). I'm over 20 a lil bit, but I think I just opened for new music styles within jpop.
Discovered Kpop and Cpop artists along the way, so I'm still fascinated by the big asian music industry.

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#28 post_url

Nov 5 12 9:20 PM

All I can talk about is myself, at the start of the year I had MAA's BubbleMan Engine and ayu's Party Queen on repeat in my car for months, but for the last 5-6 months I've had Nicki and Ke$ha on constant repeat, and really there are two main reasons why I've begun listening to Western music more this year:

1) Lack of money (blew it all on going to concerts in Japan ironically) makes CDs from Japan harder to attain. Aside from when I was in Japan, getting nishino kana's album last week was the first purchase I'd made since namie's Uncontrolled at the end of June. This has severely restricted the new music I've been listening to over the last few months... Meisa Kuroki, CKay, Yuka Masaki, all have albums out I have yet to listen to because I simply can't afford it.

2) Female solo artists have taken the backburner in the Japanese music industry now, and with artists like ayu, Kumi, namie, etc releasing less, appearing on TV less, - and even more importantly, with a lot of the artists I was crazy about in 07-10 who are now barely active at all (like ami suzuki, takasugi satomi, mika nakashima, shimatani hitomi, onitsuka chihiro, MiChi, utada, misono, ai otsuka, alan, etc etc etc), and they haven't really been replaced by a "new generation" or "wave" of artists (personally I can only think of abe mao and nishino kana). You go to Japan and all you see and hear are Johnney's, AKB and Korean groups...

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#29 post_url

Nov 5 12 10:24 PM

journey wrote:
I agree with PurpleS, but not Trekkie. I don't think sales have anything to do with international fandom popularity. There are/were quite a few people incredibly popular with international fans while having awful sales in Japan.

that's true, i guess international popularity is important too since much of the online community is overseas fans (like most of us).

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#30 post_url

Nov 6 12 4:26 AM

Furi Kuri wrote:
journey wrote:
I think the people who used to frequent J-Pop sites and communities have gotten older and grown out of posting online all the time or J-Pop altogether. when I think about the people who I used see around, most of them are over 25 now, so they probably don't have the time/energy/desire to be sitting online all day.

the K-Pop fandom is full of 12 year olds with nothing better to do.
This. 

Im 24 now, and still post and stuff but no where near the amount I used to. I think most people just found their general information needed when they were younger and can now find it without much effort needing to ask others, least I did. Most of the sites kinda self imploded as well. In general just seems like everyone spread out more than disappeared/went on to something else. 


Yea, I like this.

I think the websites of the jpop community that thrived is the ones that focused on certain artists. Most of what I do nowadays is talk about music with my friend and if i needed more fill of AKB48 I seek Stage48. lol. So maybe it's not so much as the jpop community disappearing but just spread out, especially since not all Jpop artists are the same. 

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#31 post_url

Nov 6 12 7:19 PM

thats true, there are not many active 48 fans here since there are very popular sites like stage48 and everyday48.

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#32 post_url

Nov 6 12 9:23 PM

IA with everyone like older fans and Jpop being too diverse and also imo I think Jpop fans in just don't comment or post on things in general and are more quiet like they lurk more so.........well imo

anyway in my experience it does feel a lot smaller even in Jdrama fandom but still it is big enough for me to get all my stuff and interact enough with other fans so I am good, some people use twitter,tumblr,stuff like that I like forums more and it is not like Jpop has the advantage of being promoted towards international fans like Kpop and Kdramas

and finally the face of Jpop has changed, I feel like main representatives towards Kpop fans and people randomly stumbling on it is ARASHI,AKB and Kyary..........good thing or bad thing is up to you I guess but when I got into Jpop it was Utada,Ayu,Namie,Kuu and for JE, Kat-tun and NEWS were much easier to get into than ARASHI or these newer pre-teen looking JEs imo

Last Edited By: mini Nov 7 12 1:40 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#33 post_url

Nov 7 12 5:54 PM

PurpleS wrote:

It's not just the fanbase getting older, but the late 90s through mid 00's divas themselves that attracted a lot of attention to the jpop scene. A lot of them are in their 30s now, and yeah, Namie is still doing well, but a lot of the other ones are either ready to close shop, acting weird or being moms. The AKB48 clan doesn't seem to illicit the same amount of charm to western fans that the Hello Project stuff did over a decade ago, at least here. As far as the newer divas that are getting big sales, they don't cater as much to those who got into jpop 'cause of Ayumi, Koda and whatnot. Kana, Superfly, Nana Mizuki and others have their own particular styles that don't cater to as broad of a fanbase range.


I agree with this.

I also think some things on the global music scene changed too though, jpop simply is less "different" than it was back then. IMO Lady Gaga  as an example offered some of the same things that may have appealed to at least some jpop fans that wasn't exactly a big part of the western music industry anymore before she broke through and that the new artists you mention do not. Urban music has become a bigger part of the japanese mainstream just like many other plces, whereas back then, in Japan, it wasn't to the same extent. Everything is getting more interconnected and in that way potentially more similar. Namie and ayu some of their latest CDs have basically used tracks produced and written fully abroad and that could've probably been released (with  some lyrical changes) anywhere, basically picks from a catalogue with redone vocals. I guess this is also a part of global trend where demos are more or less done songs that an artists selects only to add their own vocals and otherwise change the track very little. 

Morning Musume and H!P is a (sad depending on how you look at it) case of its own as the group has basically been reworked from an idol entertainment group to wota fodder teen idols. But this has obviously been company strategy and I guess it's much more reliable and easily manageable than what it was. it's not really comparable to AKB that was aimed mainly at that kind of fans from the beginning and based on a completely different business strategy.

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#34 post_url

Nov 8 12 12:53 AM

In addition to everyone's points about the fanbase maturing etc, Jpop is just not accessible with most record companies taking down music videos/releasing useless shortened clips. I remember back when YouTube first started I could easily find whoever/whatever I wanted with one search. Now I usually have to search dailymotion or (ugh) youku. Kpop music videos, performances, and even subbed variety shows are all easily available on YouTube by contrast because Korean music companies are looking outward, unlike Japanese music companies.

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#35 post_url

Nov 8 12 5:45 AM

i'm still here been a fan since 1996 of jpop/jrock but i stop posting on forums after 2010 for some unknown reason, i guess i got older but i'm still a big fan of jpop, with jpop there always something good out there never gets bored, you just gotta look for it.

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#36 post_url

Nov 8 12 10:06 AM

miss29 wrote:
In addition to everyone's points about the fanbase maturing etc, Jpop is just not accessible with most record companies taking down music videos/releasing useless shortened clips. I remember back when YouTube first started I could easily find whoever/whatever I wanted with one search. Now I usually have to search dailymotion or (ugh) youku. Kpop music videos, performances, and even subbed variety shows are all easily available on YouTube by contrast because Korean music companies are looking outward, unlike Japanese music companies.

I'm with you on this. Most of us from the J-Pop era had so much access to it. Now the younger generations have way more legitimate access to K-Pop. Just seems like the cycle of things.

From my experiences the J-Pop community has always been kinda small and niche based. I agree with jouney's comment about J-Pop being broken down into smaller fandoms that interact much less with people outside of that specific fandom. 

JPC (JPM) is one of the few forums I've found that has a good general population of fandoms.

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journey

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#37 post_url

Nov 8 12 12:18 PM

am I the only one who doesn't remember J-Pop being nearly as accessible in the past as people are making it out to be? I don't remember download sites being huge (they were always secretive and hard to get into like JPopSuki or KMC) and YouTube wasn't even around back in the day. it's always been a bitch to find Japanese stuff. I don't think it's gotten more difficult to access information/content, I just think stuff from rest of the world's entertainment industries have gotten way easier to get a hold of.

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#38 post_url

Nov 8 12 1:26 PM

miss29 wrote:
In addition to everyone's points about the fanbase maturing etc, Jpop is just not accessible with most record companies taking down music videos/releasing useless shortened clips. I remember back when YouTube first started I could easily find whoever/whatever I wanted with one search. Now I usually have to search dailymotion or (ugh) youku. Kpop music videos, performances, and even subbed variety shows are all easily available on YouTube by contrast because Korean music companies are looking outward, unlike Japanese music companies.
Basically this 100%! I think this might be the reason why most people migrated to K-Pop, it is just more accessible and frequent than J-Pop (and also if you are supporting an artist, less expensive) the thing about J-Pop is that each single/albums are very costly and you either have to buy them online for a pretty high amount or (if you have any) a Japanese music store near you (which would be the same as online or possibly even more) K-Pop is more affordable and obtainable for people, not only that but with K-Pop the moment that they put single/albums out IN South Korea, they will also be readily available to us on the iTunes stores in US, Europe or Canada (among other places) J-Pop takes way too long at times to be available on iTunes in a country that is not Japan.

Also, the thing about music videos really frustrates me. We are in a day and age where a music video could be obtained no matter how hard the companies try, and the majority of the time, the music video is what make people buy the single/albums that it is from. I dont understand the whole point of even bothering to upload a ridiculous short version of a music video, just put the whole thing up on YouTube! If people like the music video or are big enough fans of the artist, then they will buy the CD/DVD to have the music video to own on a physical copy, no one is going to buy a CD/DVD version for an artist just to watch the whole thing of the music video.

I think media wise, Japan is a way behind, I think they are just more concerned with domestic releases, but I do see some artists like Koda Kumi, Namie Amuro, and Ayumi Hamasaki branching out to reach other fans in other countries (like releasing material on iTunes and having more English on their sites). 

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#39 post_url

Nov 9 12 12:46 AM

^ I've had disagreements with journey, but I can vouch for what being said. I honestly can't remember Jpop being more accessible back then than it is now. In fact, Jpop is more accessible NOW than 10 years ago. When Jpop comms were thriving, Youtube was still obscure. My first direct connection with Jpop wasn't even through Youtube.

I'm probably just older than the rest of you though.

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NATE

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#40 post_url

Nov 9 12 1:18 AM

Ditto. Getting Japanese shit was a bitch until BT became popular. I remember the only way to get the good shit in great quality was to negotiate with Japanese people to trade files with you on WinMX. This kept good Jpop media extra-exclusive because you didn't want something to get out so much that it lost its value as a tradable good. I did this shit for years and only stopped as recently as 2004. Now you can find anything from just about anyone sometimes even prior to the release week, and there's no trading, no bargaining, just BT. And before WinMX, there were secret Japanese BBSs and the hoops you had to jump through to get anything was amazing. If you were not internet savvy, you were literally dependent on the kindness of those who could get access to this stuff and let me say that the Japanese were very against foreigners sharing their shit. They would retaliate if shit leaked to Western communities, like entire sites would be deleted and migrated elsewhere or they would IP ban foreign IPs.

Great quality, easily accessible music and video files are a relatively recent phenomenon in Jpop. Unless you were an advanced trader you were honestly lucky if you got a shitty ass DivX avi 320x240 video or a 128kbps mp3 back in the day. And still to this day, the most exclusive shit comes from these secret sharing groups. We're lucky to get access to those files from people willing to share them on trackers like Jpopsuki.

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